Q:

How did Rhode Island get its name?

A:

The name Rhode Island originated when the explorer Giovanni de Verrazzano wrote a letter detailing his exploration of the state in 1524 and compared the area to the Island of Rhodes in Greece. The name was made official in 1644, according to the Rhode Island Historical Society.

English colonists who settled there called the area Rode Island, as is noted in a letter written in 1637 by Roger Williams, the founder of the state. The state received a royal charter from King Charles the II of England in 1663, and was called the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. As of 2014, the state has retained the full name and is officially the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, the longest name of any state in the United States.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Where did Rhode Island get its name?

    A:

    Giovanni da Verrazzano gave Rhode Island its name in 1524. He called the region Rhode Island because it reminded him of the island of Rhodes in the Mediterranean.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How did Maine get its name?

    A:

    The name "Maine" comes from the fact that the state is on mainland, as opposed to part of the many surrounding islands. This nautical theory for the origin of Maine's name is the most prevalent, although there have been competing beliefs throughout the years. Scholars give the "mainland" theory the most credence, but there is no absolute certainty on the matter.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How did Kentucky get its name?

    A:

    The state of Kentucky's name originated from the Wyandot word, which is defined as plain, referring to the central plains abundant in the state. The name was first recorded in 1753, yet the territory of Kentucky was not established until 1790, and Kentucky became a state in 1792.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How did Arizona get its name?

    A:

    Historians disagree on the origin of the state name "Arizona," but the traditional consensus is that the name is derived from the O'odham term, "Ali-Shonak" or "Aleh-zon," the native name of an area in Arizona, which sounds like the word for "small spring." Another theory is that the name is derived from a Basque word that means "the good oak tree."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore