Q:

What effect did the Black Plague have on Europe?

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Quick Answer

The Black Plague, also known as the Black Death, was the largest pandemic in the history of Europe and had a disastrous effect on the demography of the continent. The plague also had large-scale economic and social effects.

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Full Answer

The outburst of the plague took place in 1348, and even though exact death toll figures do not exist, it is believed that up to 200 million people lost their lives by 1352. Some of the effects of the Black Death include abrupt inflation, peasant revolts that resulted in the empowerment of the poor and a fragmentation of the Church. Some historians argue that the Black Death brought the end of feudalism.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Where did the black plague come from?

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    The Black Death, also known as the Great Plague, came from China in 1334 and spread throughout Europe. The Black Death claimed a total of 75 million lives, according to History.com.

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  • Q:

    Does "Ring-Around-the-Rosie" refer to the Black Plague?

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    Contrary to myth and seeming lyrical evidence, the children's nursery rhyme "Ring Around the Rosie" is not a reference to either the physical symptoms or social condition of the bubonic plague, also known as the Black Death. The exact origins of the nursery rhyme are difficult to pin down, and though certain parts of the rhyme seem pretty morbid, referencing ashes and mass falling down, which could be seen as a reference to death and cremation, there's no evidence to connect "Ring Around the Rosie" with the Black Death, which took place in Western Europe during the mid 1300s C.E. In fact, multiple versions of the rhyme have been published, some of which don't actually contain the supposed references to the bubonic plague.

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  • Q:

    How did the Black Death spread?

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    "Black Death" refers to a 14th-century outbreak of the bubonic plague, a bacterial infection spread primarily by infected fleas, though the disease can also be transmitted by person-to-person contact in its pneumonic form. According to About.com, the epidemic began with the fall of Kaffa, a Venetian colony in the Crimea.

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  • Q:

    Who were the flagellants during the Black Death?

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    During the Black Death, the flagellants were groups of people who wandered from town to town whipping themselves and each other with scourges. They believed that the plague was a punishment from God and that their self-mutilation was a form of atonement.

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