Q:

Who first discovered photosynthesis?

A:

The concept of photosynthesis was first explored by Dutch physician Jan Baptista van Helmot in 1648 during an experiment involving a willow tree. Helmot discovered that plants did not get their nutrients from the soil. However, it took several other botanists and scientists to unravel the process of photosynthesis.

Joseph Priestley, a chemist, discovered that air was composed of gases. In 1730, Dutch biologist Jan Ingenhousz reported that plants produced oxygen. Further discovery was made by Jean Senebier, a Swiss botanist, who uncovered the role of carbon dioxide in photosynthesis. It wasn't until 1845 that Swiss chemist Nicolas-Theodore de Saussure was able to finally draw all the pieces of photosynthesis together.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Who discovered longitude and latitude?

    A:

    Two Greek mathematicians pioneered research to navigate and map the Earth. Eratosthenes of Cyrene, chief librarian at the Ancient Library of Alexandria, calculated the circumference of the Earth in the third century B.C. In the second century B.C., Hipparchus of Nicea first used mathematics to calculate latitude and longitude, invented the first astrolabe to observe stars and measure latitude, and observed lunar eclipses to propose longitudes for specific cities.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who discovered baking soda?

    A:

    The form of baking soda, or sodium bicarbonate as it is known today, was first produced by Nicolas Leblanc, a French chemist in 1791. It was first mass-produced in a factory in1846 by John Dwight and Austin Church in New York.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who discovered math?

    A:

    No one person can take credit for the discovery of math. However, mathematics has developed over time, and many people have contributed to its different fields or branches that include algebra, geometry and trigonometry.

      Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How was sulfur discovered?

    A:

    The existence of sulfur dates back to ancient times and is referred to in the Bible as "brimstone." In 1789, a French chemist named Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier recognized it and added it to his famous list of elements. In 1823, a German chemist named Eilhard Mitscherlich discovered sulfur's allotrophy.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore