Q:

Who was the first pharaoh of Egypt?

A:

The first Pharaoh of Egypt was Menes, who is also sometimes referred to as Narmer. He lived around 2925 BCE, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica.

Menes became Pharaoh when he united two separate areas of Egypt: Upper Egypt and Lower Egypt. Menes was a king of Upper Egypt who conquered Lower Egypt by force. Once he achieved this victory, he merged the two regions together under his personal rule. The rulers of a unified Egypt were eventually known as Pharaohs, although the term, which means "Great House," was originally used to describe the large palace in which the rulers lived.


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