Q:

When was the first printer invented?

A:

Although the technology behind the dry printing process was invented in 1938 by Chester Carlson, the first computer printer is generally considered to have been invented in 1953 by Remington Rand. This first printer was developed to be used solely with the Universal Automatic Computer or UNIVAC.

IBM and Xerox were among the first companies to release laser printers for the computer. The IBM 3800 is recorded to have been installed at a data center in Milwaukee, Wash., in 1976. The first Xerox laser printer, the 9700, was released in 1977 and was developed based on the original laser printer developed by Xerox in 1971.


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