Q:

What was the government of Megara in ancient Greece?

A:

The ancient Greek city of Megara had a tyrannical government. Megara began its existence as a protectorate of Corinth, which directly ruled the city as one of its territories. In the 7th century B.C., the city staged a successful revolt against Corinthian rule and became a tyranny under its king, Theagenes.

Despite being a tyrant, Theagenes depended heavily on popular support. Early in his rise to power, Theagenes courted this support from the poor of Megara by slaughtering the cattle of the city's wealthiest citizens.

In time, Megara fell into the orbit of Sparta, though it remained independent with regard to its internal policies. Megara's secession from the Peloponnesian League was the proximate cause of the first Peloponnesian War, and Athens' attempt to break the city economically was the proximate cause of the second Peloponnesian War. These wars left Megara's government increasingly dependent on the oligarchy of Sparta for political, economic and military support.

In 338 B.C., the Macedonian army, commanded by the 18-year-old Alexander the Great, crushed the southern Greek forces and completed the conquest of Attica, including Megara. For the rest of its history, Megara was directly ruled by a remote government, first that of the Macedonians, then the Romans and, eventually, the Byzantines.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What were Alexander the Great's major contributions?

    A:

    According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, Alexander the Great's major contribution to history was the spread of Greek culture throughout the Middle East and Central Asia. His large territorial empire also encouraged trade between cultures that had previously had little contact, encouraging economic growth and the flow of ideas between Greece and North India.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why was Hippocrates called the "father of medicine"?

    A:

    As Greekmedicine.net explains, Hippocrates is known as the father of modern medicine because he was the first doctor who held reason, logic and science to be central in the practice. Before Hippocrates’ teachings spread throughout the world, the practice of medicine was rife magic, superstitions and supernatural elements. While modern medicine has changed greatly since the time of Hippocrates, his dedication to science changed medicine forever.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    When was the Parthenon built?

    A:

    The Parthenon was built between 447 and 432 BC on the acropolis of Athens and dedicated to Athena. It also accommodated a newly-constructed statue of the goddess. The temple and statue were funded by a surplus from the war treasury of the Greek alliance that formed to defeat the Persians.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What roles did women play in Ancient Athens?

    A:

    In Ancient Athens, women were not treated equally to men and mostly only served as wives and mothers. Women were treated particularly poorly when it came to marriage, though they could own property under certain circumstances.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore