Q:

Who was the Greek god of roads and transportation?

A:

Quick Answer

The Greek god of roads and travel is Hermes. He was also the Greek god of animal husbandry, astrology and astronomy, hospitality, gymnasiums, heralds, diplomacy and trade, writing and language, thievery, persuasion, and athletic contests.

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Full Answer

Hermes was often depicted as being either a handsome, athletic youth or as an older bearded man. He usually was seen wearing winged boots, and sometimes also had a winged traveler's cap and a chlamys cloak. He also carried a herald's wand and was the personal herald of Zeus. As one of the twelve Olympians, he is seen frequently throughout Greek mythology. The Roman god equivalent of Hermes is Mercury.

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