Q:

Which Indians used teepees?

A:

Quick Answer

The nomadic Plains Indian tribes used teepees. Plains Indians is a blanket term that includes a number of individual tribes, including Pawnee, Omaha, Plains Apache and Lakota, among many others. Another style of mobile housing is called a wigwam.

Know More
Which Indians used teepees?
Credit: Barrett & MacKay All Canada Photos Getty Images

Full Answer

Teepees are also spelled tipi and tepee, depending on the individual and group. Teepees were essential for the plains tribes, who were regularly on the move and following food sources, such as buffalo herds. It was also necessary to move to continue to hunt without running out of the existing food supply. In most tribes, the teepee belonged to the women of the family, who set it up and made decisions about decoration. The structures were simple, made from long poles strung together and covered with hide, and were easy to transport across even large distances.

Wigwams were similar to the teepee in that they could be uprooted and moved to a new location when necessary. However, wigwams were sturdier, longer-lasting structures that were typically used when a tribe or group intended to settle in one area for a long time and did not anticipate moving. There were two variations in the use of these structures: fully nomadic and semi-sedentary. The latter group more commonly used wigwams in addition to teepees; fully nomadic groups generally relied on teepees.

Learn more in US History

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Who were the Jumano Indians?

    A:

    The Jumano Indians were a group of Indians who were made up of at least three different tribes of Indians. The name Jumano was used to describe the Indians who were found on the plains and in the southwest from the 1500s to the 1700s.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who are the Kwakiutl Indians?

    A:

    The Kwakiutl Indians are indigenous people who originated in British Columbia, Canada and expanded through Vancouver Island, nearby mainlands and other islands. As of 2014, there are approximately 7,718 Kwakiutl people.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where did the Mohawk Indians get their name?

    A:

    The name "Mohawk," which means “eater of living things” or “man eater,” was given to the tribe by English and Dutch settlers, who used the term to describe many of the tribes in New England and New York. The Mohawk referred to themselves as “Kahniakehake.”

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What did the Great Basin Indians eat?

    A:

    The Great Basin Indians ate seeds, nuts, berries, roots, bulbs, cattails, grasses, deer, bison, rabbits, elk, insects, lizards, salmon, trout and perch. The specific foods varied, depending on the tribe and where they were located in the Great Basin.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore