Q:

Who invented the electric fan?

A:

Quick Answer

The electric fan was invented by Schuyler Skaats Wheeler in 1882. Wheeler's original electric fan consisted of two blades that were turned by an electric motor.

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Full Answer

Wheeler was 22 years of age when he invented the electric fan. In addition to the fan, he also invented and held a patent for an electric battery.

In 1905, he became the president of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers. Early in his career, Wheeler was a part of Thomas A. Edison's engineering staff. He even held a supervisory role at an Edison plant in New York. His electric fan was invented after he helped to establish his own company.

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