Q:

Who invented the first chair?

A:

Quick Answer

The ancient Egyptians are believed to be the first to invent a four-legged seat with a back, better known to most as a chair. The earliest examples have been found in tombs dating as far back as 2680 B.C.

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Full Answer

The first chairs were low to the ground, ornately carved, and reserved for royalty and members of the priesthood. During the Renaissance, chairs became lighter and more varied in style. As life became more social, chairs became more prevalent.

By the 1800s, most American households had enough chairs for every family member. However, it wasn't until the 1900s that designers looked beyond the ancient materials of wood, animal hide and fabric and began exploring the possibilities of chair design with metal and plastic.

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