Q:

Who invented the first pendulum?

A:

The pendulum was discovered by Italian scientist and scholar Galileo Galilei in 1602. The Pendulum is made from a light rod or string with a weight at one end. Galileo was the first to examine its unique characteristics and found that each pendulum has a constant period.

The period is the time that it takes for a pendulum to complete a single oscillation, which is one motion from out from and back to its starting point. For example, The time required for a pendulum to return to its furthest right position after being released from that point. It passes twice through the arc during each period. The pendulum has influenced science, research and technology heavily since its discovery.


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