Q:

Who invented the first robot?

A:

Quick Answer

The first robot was created by the Greek mathematician Archytas of Tarentum. It was a flying wooden dove that traveled up to 200 meters through the air by flapping its wings.

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Who invented the first robot?
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Full Answer

Researchers are not certain how Archytas powered his robot but believe it was either compressed air or an internal steam engine. Little is known of the device because its existence was not recorded until hundreds of years after its invention. Apparently the robot was attached to a cable that was part of a pulley and counterweight system. In addition to getting an early start in the field of robotics, Archytas is known as the originator of the science of mechanics.


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