Q:

Why is Kentucky called the "Bluegrass State"?

A:

Kentucky was nicknamed the "Bluegrass State" because of the bluegrass that early settlers found growing there. Seeds for the plant soon became in demand, earning the state the nickname.

The grass gets its color from its blooms, not the grass itself. It can be planted in other places. It is also a perennial, so it comes back every year, and it is used not only as lawn cover, but also for pasture cover, since it is a good food source for horses. It usually grows from about 1 to 3 feet tall, and it grows closely together. It can be invasive, as it pushes out other plants in the area if it can. It can grow in most types of soil, from dry to moist.


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