Q:

Why was Moshe the Beadle important to Elie Wiesel?

A:

Quick Answer

Moshe the Beadle, in the story called "Night," is Elie Wiesel's spiritual adviser in his Jewish faith. Despite the fact that Moshe disappears after the first few pages of the book, the ideas he teaches Elie resonate throughout the rest of the story and throughout Elie's life.

Know More

Full Answer

Moshe studies and shares his views with Elie about Jewish mysticism. He is Elie's Cabbala teacher and talks about the riddles of the universe and god's importance in the quest for understanding. With Moshe's teachings, even after Moshe is no longer in the book, Elie questions his faith, which is part of the Jewish mysticism. This continues until Elie witnesses the death of the pipel in Buna. At this point, Elie becomes full of answers, not questions. It is at this point that Elie loses his faith.

Another reason Moshe is so important to Elie is because of the warning Moshe gives to the people of Sighet before they are put into concentration camps. Moshe considers himself a messenger after escaping the Gestapo in Poland. However, his behavior leads the Jews to believe he has lost his mind and they ignore the warning. This knowledge is something that Elie takes with him throughout his journey through the concentration camps.

Learn more about World War 2

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the theme in "Night" by Elie Wiesel?

    A:

    There are multiple themes present in Elie Wiesel's book "Night" including the struggle for Eliezer to keep his faith in a kind God, the inhumane treatment of humans by humans and the silence found in the lack of response from the victims in the concentration camps and the lack of God's response to the atrocities. These themes are all shown through the eyes of the main character, Eliezer, as he struggles with his Jewish faith.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who is the only family member of Elie Wiesel to survive the Holocaust?

    A:

    Elie Wiesel actually has two, not one, surviving family members from the Holocaust. Both of his older sisters. Hilda and Bea Wiesel survived the death camps, although they were separated from Elie during and after the war. The rest of their family perished.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What literary devices were used in "Night" by Elie Wiesel?

    A:

    Elie Wiesel's memoir "Night" uses literary devices involving figurative language, such as similes, as well as devices involving alterations in sentence structure, using balanced sentences and periodic sentences to alter the rhythm of the text. These devices connect points in the story to important themes, states Cliffs Notes.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why did Elie Wiesel write the book "Night"?

    A:

    Elie Wisel wrote the book "Night" as a memoir of his experiences as a Jew during the Holocaust. He calls himself a "messenger of the dead among the living" through his literary witness. "Night" chronicles the Holocaust and serves as the springboard for all of Wiesel's compositions.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore