Q:

When was Robert Hooke born?

A:

Robert Hooke was born on July 28, 1635. Hooke was an English natural philosopher, or an early scientist, and architect who was instrumental in designing and rebuilding London after the fire of 1666.

Although Robert Hooke is not as well-known as his contemporary Isaac Newton, Hooke's law of elasticity is still taught in engineering and physics courses. Hooke's law states that the stretching of an object is proportional to the force applied. Hooke also proposed an early form of the inverse-square law of planetary motion, and became involved in a heated dispute when Newton proposed a similar law in his work.

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