Q:

How was Roman art different from Greek art?

A:

Quick Answer

Classical Roman art differed from classical Greek art because Roman art focused on realism, while Greek art focused on idealism. Roman artists typically made realistic portraits and sculptures. The works of art made by Greek artists demonstrated the ideal physical form.

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Full Answer

Roman art imitated Greek art in many ways because the Romans learned about painting and sculpting from the Greeks, during the time when Rome conquered Greece. Roman copies of Greek art are sometimes mistaken for being Greek in origin. The Greeks idealized the human form because much of their art was a portrayal of their gods. They also used their finest athletes as models. Roman art was primarily used for decoration, and the artists added quirks to their pieces that added to the humanity. The Romans were less imaginative than the Greeks in many ways, including art and religion, where they copied statues of Greek gods and goddesses.

Some of the most popular Greek pieces include the Aphrodite of Melos, also known as the Venus de Milo, and the Parthenon sculptures. The Greeks also made vases with paintings on them. The statue of Augustus is one of the most popular Roman works. Roman art is also known for the fresco, a type of wall painting.

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