Q:

What was the significance of the English Bill of Rights?

A:

The English Bill of Rights limited the power of English leaders and was written by parliament. The English Bill of Rights is the English version of the Constitution.

The English Bill of Rights established that Englishmen had inalienable civil and political rights that must be upheld. However, religious liberty was limited for anyone who was not a protestant. Catholics were banned from the throne under the Bill of Rights. Kings and Queens had to swear under oath  to uphold Protestantism as the official religion of England. Monarchs could not build their own courts or act as judges unless they received the consent of parliament themselves.

The English Bill of Rights also stopped the monarchs from preventing Protestants from bearing arms, created a standard army and stopped them from imposing fines or punishments without trial. Monarchs could not impose cruel an unusual punishments on the citizens or give them excessive bail. Within the English Bill of Rights, free speech was also protected. These provisions were then adopted into the Constitution and can be seen in the first, second, fourth, fifth, sixth and eighth amendment. Parliament passed the English Bill of Rights on December 16, 1689. It's accompanied by the Magna Carta, the Petition of Right and the Habeas Corpus Act of 1679.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Why have the fortunes of much of the English gentry degenerated?

    A:

    The primary reasons for the decline of the English gentry were taxation, reformed voting laws, the industrial revolution and war, according to About.com. To a lesser degree, women's suffrage and the rise of divorce were also contributors.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What were some of the outcomes of the English Civil War?

    A:

    Some of the outcomes of the English Civil War were the end of the personal-rule monarchy, the establishment of a commonwealth government and the rise of Oliver Cromwell to a leadership role that is often viewed as resembling a military dictatorship. One of the consequences of the war was Cromwell's campaign against Catholics and Royalists in Ireland and the confiscation of their lands to pay off the debts of the English Parliament, a long-lasting historical memory that has helped fuel Irish and English strife into modern times. Although the monarchy was restored in 1660 by the ascension of the Stuart dynasty to the throne 2 years after Cromwell's death, an additional and key outcome of the English Civil War was that it established the principle of an English king requiring Parliamentary consent in order to govern.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the English Bill of Rights?

    A:

    The English Bill of Rights is a document penned and approved by Parliament in 1689 that limited the powers of co-sovereigns William and Mary. The document outlines the rights of Parliament, including freedom of speech, regular elections and the ability to petition the monarch without fear of retribution. The English Bill of Rights was a precursor to similar enumerations in the Constitution of the United States of America, explains BillofRightsInstitute.org.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What did Isaac Newton contribute to science?

    A:

    Isaac Newton's greatest contribution to science was his universal law of gravitation, in which he described the laws of gravity after seeing an apple from a tree. According to Encyclopædia Britannica, Newton's law of gravitation suggests that bigger masses attract more strongly and that the distance between masses affects the amount of gravity experienced by each mass, reducing by the square of the distance.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore