Q:

What was the significance of "The Federalist Papers"?

A:

Quick Answer

"The Federalist Papers," which were a collection of 85 letters written by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay between 1787 and 1788. These letters were sent to newspapers, and their goal was to promote the ratification of the U.S. Constitution. According to the History Channel's website, nine out of 13 states had to ratify the Constitution before it would replace the Articles of Confederation.

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Full Answer

"The Federalist Papers," which were published in a book known as "The Federalist" in 1788, are significant mainly because they were effective in persuading states to ratify the Constitution. The authors used logical argument to explain the importance of such a change, directly addressing the concerns of those opposed to ratification. After newspapers published the papers, readers sent letters both praising and condemning the ideas presented within. This gave Hamilton, Madison and Jay an opportunity to address the concerns of their opposition and make the public aware of the ideas behind the constitution.

Probe lists several other reasons for the importance of "The Federalist Papers." First, they provide a very systematic and comprehensive analysis of the constitution that has been referenced by government throughout the nation's history. Second, they explain the motives of the Founding Fathers in writing the constitution, framing its purpose.

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