Q:

When was V-J Day?

A:

Quick Answer

V-J Day was on August 14, 1945. V-J Day marks the day that Japan surrendered to the Allied forces during World War II with "V-J" standing for "victory over Japan" and signifying the end of the conflict in the Pacific Theater.

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Full Answer

Some historians argue that V-J Day is actually September 2, 1945, which marked the formal surrender of the Japanese to the Allies. On this day, the Japanese foreign minister and chief of staff of the Japanese army surrendered to General Douglas MacArthur in Tokyo Bay aboard the battleship U.S.S. Missouri.

V-E Day is regarded as May 8, 1945 and marks the official surrender of Nazi Germany to the Allies.

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    What was the WWII Double V campaign?

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