Q:

What were the effects of the Haitian Revolution?

A:

The Haitian Revolution established the country of Haiti, ended French designs on the New World and led to a racial panic in the United States. Haiti became the first successful slave uprising in the Americas. This new republic, however, was not welcomed into the community of nations because of international fears of other slave uprisings.

The United States, Haiti's near neighbor, refused to recognize the new country. Although Thomas Jefferson, the president at the time, had written eloquently about freedom and liberty, he knew that recognizing the new nation would stir up opposition from slave owners in the United States. He also worried that the rebellion would inspire similar uprisings closer to home. One such uprising did take place. The German Coast Uprising of 1811 that took place in Louisiana was inspired by the Haitian Revolution and possibly even led by former Haitians. Though successfully put down, it frightened American slave owners, leading to harsher treatment and closer control over slave life.

The Haitian Revolution also led to the Louisiana Purchase. In 1803, Thomas Jefferson bought land from France that extended from Louisiana to Montana, doubling the size of the United States overnight. This led to more states, increasing sectionalist tension between slave states and states in the north that were transitioning away from slavery. This tension persisted until the Civil War.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Why was the Haitian Revolution unique?

    A:

    While the Haitian Revolution was not the only one of its day, it was the only revolution in modern history, and perhaps all of world history, where the revolutionary population was comprised almost entirely of slaves who successfully ousted their former masters to form an entirely new society.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What were the causes of the Glorious Revolution?

    A:

    The Glorious Revolution was a political coup that took place in Great Britain during the mid-17th century; the main cause of this conflict was growing Protestant concern over King James II's strict adherence to his Catholic faith. This conflict is also known as the Revolution of 1688, and it resulted in the solidification of Parliament's power over the monarch and the Catholic King James II being replaced by his daughter, the Protestant Queen Mary, and her husband King William III. Although this was a political conflict that resulted in the deposition of a ruling monarch, it was a relatively peaceful transition in military terms, resulting in little bloodshed.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What were the effects of the Crusades?

    A:

    Two major effects of the Crusades were that the kings' authority increased and the Europeans learned about new things from the Muslims they encountered. During the Crusades, the kings increased taxes to fund the cause. Many peasants also left their land to fight, and when they died, the land went to the king. With large amounts of money and land coming in, the kings gained power.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What were the negative effects of the Crusades?

    A:

    Negative effects of the Crusades included the repeated defeats of the Christian armies, the slaughter of innocents and the looting of Constantinople. The destruction of Constantinople severed any hope of mending the East-West schism in Christianity, and this event left the Byzantine Empire vulnerable to the Ottoman Empire.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore