Q:

What were the psychological effects on soldiers that served in World War 1?

A:

Quick Answer

Soldiers returning from World War 1 suffered from a wide range of conditions collectively described as shell shock, which resulted in symptoms ranging from panic attacks to neurotic paralysis of the body. According to HealthGuidance, these types of mental effects are now formally referred to as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

 Know More

Full Answer

WebMD states that PTSD is "a serious condition that can develop after a person has experienced or witnessed a traumatic or terrifying event in which serious physical harm occurred or was threatened." The cause of shell shock in World War 1 soldiers was due to the traumatic scenes they had witnessed combined with a large amount of time spent away from civilization. Soldiers were often under constant machine gun fire and witnessed fellow soldiers killed by enemy bombs and ammunition.

Former soldiers have been known to react strongly to anything that reminds them of the traumas they experienced and may begin to avoid anything they associate with them. Soldiers may also be reluctant to mingle socially due to loud noises that remind them of bombings or crowds of people that remind them of their time spent in crowded trenches. According to NBC News, one in every eight soldiers suffers from PTSD.

Learn more about World War 1

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What age were soldiers in Word War I?

    A:

    While the official ages to serve in all of the countries in World War 1 ranged from about 17-45 years old, records indicate that some soldiers serving in the British army were as young as 12 years old.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What clothing did soldiers wear in World War I?

    A:

    Uniforms of American soldiers in World War I consisted of a tunic, overcoat and trousers in olive drab wool for winter, with a lighter weight of khaki cotton for summer. The uniforms for enlisted men and officers were substantially the same, with the same design and placement of high collars, pockets and shoulder straps.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many soldiers died in World War I?

    A:

    Although an exact figure is not possible owing to questionable accuracy and destroyed records, approximately 8.5 to 10.8 million soldiers were killed during World War I. Of these deaths, 5.1 to 6.4 million were inflicted on the Allied nations, while 3.3 to 4.3 million were suffered by the Central Powers.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What was life like for soldiers in World War I?

    A:

    Life for soldiers in World War I followed a specific routine that involved waking up at around 5 a.m., performing military drills when not engaged in direct combat, eating breakfast, having an early dinner, sleeping briefly, performing more military exercises and then doing physical labor before retiring for the evening. Soldiers in World War I spent most of the time in trenches on the front line. They rarely moved from the trenches except to move from one battle ground to the next, and shared close living and sleeping quarters with other men.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore