Q:

What were the two sides in the American Civil War?

A:

The two sides involved in the American Civil War were the Union, which represented the North, and the Confederacy, which represented the South. There were numerous reason behind why each side's soldiers fought for one side or the other.

The North and its troops originally fought because they felt the South had no legal right to secede from the Union and was close to treason. As it seemed that the North might lose the war as well as support, ending slavery became the new focus of the war, rallying new support for the North. The South and its soldiers fought for state rights and to defend themselves from the North, but soon the point of slavery became a factor in the South as well, even before it became a rally cry in the North.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    When did the American Civil War end?

    A:

    The U.S. Civil War ended on April 9, 1865, when Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, VA. Some fighting continued after this date, but this is considered the official end of the war.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How did the American Civil War end?

    A:

    The American Civil War essentially ended in the spring of 1865, with the surrender of Robert E. Lee and his troops, the last major Confederate army, to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox, Va., on April 9, 1865. However, the last battle was fought at Palmito Ranch, Texas, on May 13, and the last confederate army ceased to exist when General Kirby Smith surrendered and signed the treaty on June 2.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    When was the American Civil War?

    A:

    The American Civil War began on April 12, 1861, with a battle at Fort Sumter in South Carolina. The war ended when General Robert E. Lee, of the Army of the Confederacy, surrendered on May 9, 1865. The last shot was fired in Texas in June of 1865.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How did sectionalism lead to the American Civil War?

    A:

    In the years prior to the American Civil War, a separate sense of cultural, political and economic identity developed and took hold between the North and the South that helped lead to the conflict. Sectionalism, which refers to loyalty to a section of a nation rather than to the nation as a whole, contributed to a Southern identity based not only on a distinctively different way of life, but on a geographically shared mistrust and apprehension towards the Northern way of life represented by the federal government and the election of United States President Abraham Lincoln. By the time of the election, the South had already developed its own sense of regional nationalism, based on a slave-labor agrarian economic system, that felt threatened by the anti-slavery stance of the heavily-industrialized North.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore