Q:

What are ancient Roman coins called?

A:

Quick Answer

There is no contemporary term to refer to all Roman coins, but common denominations include the gold aureus, the silver denarius and the brass sestertius. Romans first minted coins in the late 4th century B.C. and used many different types over the centuries.

Know More

Full Answer

Instead of coins, the early Roman Republic used bronze weights. This system evolved into the bronze coin called an "as." The silver denarius (plural: denarii) was first minted around 211 B.C. and remained in use for five centuries. Emporor Augustus reformed the monetary system at the start of the Imperial period, bringing the gold aureus into wider use and introducing the brass sestertius and dupondius.

Learn more about Coins & Currency

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How long do coins last?

    A:

    Coins last for about 25 years before they are too worn down to remain in circulation, according to the U.S. Mint. Unusable coins are recycled, and the metal is reused in new coins.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What coins are valuable?

    A:

    Three of the most valuable coins in the United States are the 1913 Liberty Head V Nickel, the 1893 S Morgan Silver Dollar and the 1901 Morgan Silver Dollar, according to CoinTrackers.com. Other extremely valuable coins are the 1889 CC Morgan Silver Dollar and the 1895 O Morgan Silver Dollar.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What do you call someone who collects coins?

    A:

    The technical term for a person that collects and studies coins is numismatist. The word was taken from the French word numismatiste, which means student of coin and coinage.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How much are my English coins worth?

    A:

    As of 2014, there are eight coins circulated in the British currency system, which include the one pence, two pence, five pence, ten pence, twenty pence, fifty pence, one Pound and two Pound coins. The reverse designs on each coin is changed annually, according to About.com.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore