What are the Elizabeth II coins?
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Q:

What are the Elizabeth II coins?

A:

Quick Answer

Elizabeth II coins are coins carrying the head of Queen Elizabeth II on them. All British coins and the majority of the 53 member countries of the Commonwealth carry the head of Queen Elizabeth II on the obverse side of the coin.

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Full Answer

The original coins with the head of Queen Elizabeth II carried a likeness of her as she looked in 1953. As she began to age, the head of the coin changed. The likeness now reflects a queen who, as of September, 2014, has been on the throne for over 62 years. As of 1992, Hong Kong no longer uses Queen Elizabeth II head on coins, but there are still many of these coins in circulation, and they continue to be legal tender.

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