Q:

Whose face is on the $1 coin?

A:

Quick Answer

As of 2014, the four Presidential $1 Coins feature the faces of Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Four new Presidential $1 Coins are minted each year, showcasing the faces of the U.S. presidents in the order in which they served.

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Full Answer

The Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005 requires coins to be minted by the Secretary of the Treasury in memory of each past United States president. On the back of each $1 coin is the Statue of Liberty.

Other $1 coins released throughout history are the Liberty Seated Dollar, Peace Dollar, Eisenhower Dollar, the golden dollar featuring the face of Sacagawea and the Susan B. Anthony dollar.

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