Q:

How heavy is a penny?

A:

Quick Answer

A penny weighs 0.0081 ounces. Twelve pennies weigh approximately 1 ounce, and 182 pennies, or $1.82 in pennies, weigh approximately 1 pound. The penny is the lightest of all U.S. coins.

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Full Answer

A penny is 0.75 inches in diameter and is approximately 0.06 inches thick. It is the second smallest in both diameter and thickness of the U.S. coins with measurements exceeding only those of the dime. The composition of a penny is 2.5 percent copper, and the rest is zinc. This design of penny has been in circulation since 1857; the original penny minted in the United States was larger than the one presently used and was made solely of copper.

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    What is a 1945 copper penny?

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    What is a 1933 penny worth?

    A:

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