Q:

What does ISO stand for in photography?

A:

IOS stands for "International Organization of Standardization." This organization sets the standards for photography, so ISO settings are based on those standards.

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ISO settings refer to how much light the camera captures. With film, it refers to how much light the film would capture, while with a digital camera, it refers to how sensitive the image sensor is. A lower ISO setting captures less light, while a higher ISO setting captures more light. Higher ISOs can help capture images when there is less light. However, higher settings also makes photos grainier, which can result in a loss of quality in the image.

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  • Q:

    What is photography?

    A:

    Photography is the series of actions involving light or electromagnetic radiation to record images of objects on various surfaces. Photography always requires light to duplicate the real-life image being taken. Photography enlists the use of a camera to capture the image needed to produce the recreation of the image onto photographic film.

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    A:

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    High dynamic range, or HDR, photography is created through the use of special editing software to layer several photos together of the same image taken at different exposure levels. The goal is to produce a single photo that contains added detail and quality.

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    A:

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