Q:

What is the name of a chess move?

A:

A well-known chess move is the Queen's Gambit. It is a common move used in the opening by the player controlling the white pieces.

The move involves the player controlling the white pieces to move a pawn from d4, rather than the more common e4 move, and follows that up with a c4 move. This classic move offers a pawn to gain a stronger position, but in reality, the player controlling the black pieces cannot expect to hold onto the pawn if he or she chooses to capture it. The player controlling the black pieces then has several options to respond with: the Queen's Gambit Accepted, the Queen's Gambit Declined or the Slav Defense.

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