Q:

How do you sew on a satin baby blanket binding?

A:

To attach a satin binding on a baby blanket, select a binding that coordinates with the blanket, lay the binding flat, place the edge of the blanket into the center of the strip, fold the binding again, and pin tightly. Sew the edges of the binding, catching the binding both above and beneath the blanket. Continue around the blanket until the entire blanket is bound.

  1. Choose a satin blanket binding

    Blanket binding is sold in fabric stores and online venues. Even small baby blankets require two or more packs to ensure there is enough length to go all the way around. Coordinate the color of the binding with the fabric.

  2. Open the first package of binding

    Open the package of binding, and notice that the satin strip is folded in half. Press the sides of the satin strip if desired, but do not try to iron out the center fold. Lay the binding on the work surface.

  3. Place the blanket onto the binding

    Lay the edge of the blanket onto the binding, putting it exactly against the fold down the middle of the satin strip. Work with one small section at a time. Fold the binding again to create a little sandwich there with binding on the bottom, fabric in the middle, and binding on the top again.

  4. Pin the binding into place

    Using very sharp pins, pin the binding to the blanket. The pins should be quite close together. Pin one side, but stop pinning 3 1/2 inches from the end. Miter the corner by folding the sides in and forming a tight, smooth corner. Pin snugly. Continue around the next edge.

  5. Add second package of binding

    At the end of the first strip of binding, open the next package of binding. Tuck the beginning of the new strip under itself, then pin it over the ending of the old strip. Continue pinning and mitering the corners as before.

  6. Sew the binding

    Use sharp sewing machine needles so the satin does not catch and snag. Set the machine to a medium width and a short-length zigzag stitch. Position the fabric under the needle so the zigzag catches the fabric on one swing and the binding on the other. Sewing that way also catches the bottom edge of the binding. Sew carefully, trying hard not to stretch the binding.

  7. Finish the corners

    After finishing the entire blanket with the zigzag stitch, go back to the first corner, and sew the mitered edges. Do the same with all four corners. Sew where the two binding strips join. Ensure that the edges and corners are tight, so the baby using the blanket cannot pull the binding off.

  8. Remove all pins

    Check carefully to ensure that all pins are removed from the entire blanket. Wash and dry blanket, if desired, before presenting it to the baby.

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