Q:

What is the value of a 1975 Canadian 25 cent coin with Elizabeth II on it?

A:

Quick Answer

As of 2014, a 1975 Canadian 25 cent coin with Elizabeth II on the front is only worth face value unless it's in nearly perfect uncirculated condition. The coin is worth 45 cents if given at least an AU 50 grading by a coin dealer.

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Full Answer

The grading system used by coin dealers covers conditions from poor to mint. The condition of a coin is only one factor in the coin's collectible value. Coins that were produced in large quantities and are relatively recent, such as a 1975 Canadian Elizabeth II quarter, are unlikely to have much collectible value as of 2014.

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