What does "Mardi Gras" mean?
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Q:

What does "Mardi Gras" mean?

A:

Quick Answer

In French, the word "Mardi" means "Tuesday," and the word "gras" means "fat," meaning that Mardi Gras translates to English as "Fat Tuesday." The name comes from the practice of preparing for the start of a period of fasting on Ash Wednesday, which immediately follows Mardi Gras. This preparation may involve eating rich foods and using up ingredients like fat, eggs and dairy, which may not be allowed during Lent.

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Full Answer

Foods traditionally associated with this holiday include pancakes, pastries and other sweet treats made using the above-mentioned ingredients. The "fat" in Fat Tuesday can refer to the ingredients and to the practice of indulging in tasty foods.

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    How do you customize Mardi Gras doubloons or coins?

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    Mardi Gras doubloons and wooden coins used as Mardi Gras throws can be struck with specific images unique to the customer and then mass-produced. The higher price of customized coins and doubloons reflects the initial work that goes into making the mass-produced coins unique.

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    What foods are served for Mardi Gras?

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    Many traditional dishes from Louisiana are served during Mardi Gras, including gumbo, crawfish. po-boy sandwiches and king cake, all of which are popular in the region. Gumbo is an iconic dish in the city of New Orleans.

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    What do people wear to Mardi Gras?

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    To celebrate Mardi Gras in style, it's recommended that visitors to New Orleans don festive costumes. Costumes can range from dressing up for a masquerade ball attendee to a witch ready for trick-or-treating.

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  • Q:

    What was the first Mardi Gras krewe?

    A:

    In 1857, the Mistick Krewe of Comus became the first official Mardi Gras organization in New Orleans, setting the stage for generations of krewes to come and, according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune, even preventing Mardi Gras from becoming a mere violent street party. Though the original krewe no longer parades, the Comus organization is still active, producing a royal court each year.

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