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What is an antique pump organ worth?

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Quick Answer

As of 2014, an antique pump organ is worth $100 to several thousand dollars depending on its condition. For example, an antique Victorian pump organ dated circa 1865 to 1915 is worth between $1,000 and $1,500 in poor condition. Totally restored, its value is between $6,500 and $10,000.

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What is an antique pump organ worth?
Credit: Joel Kramer CC-BY 2.0

Full Answer

Establishing the value of an antique pump organ often depends on proving its date of origin. To be considered an antique, a Reed pump organ must be at least 100 years old. If an organ meets the age criteria, missing pieces and damage can cause a drop in value. Pump organs tend to be hard to sell and may be sold for less than estimated value.

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