Q:

What is fully killed steel?

A:

Fully killed steel is steel that has had all of its oxygen content removed and is typically combined with an agent before use in applications, such as casting. The four levels of steel kill include fully killed steel with all oxygen removed, semi-killed steel with the partial removal of oxygen, rimmed steel and capped steel.

Deoxidized steel is essential for a variety of purposes. Killed steels are homogeneous substances that produce little gas when cooled and solidified. Common examples of killed steels are alloy steel and stainless steel, which have smooth surfaces and minimal carbon content. Many manufacturers use killed steel in products to prevent irregularities and porous products.


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