Q:

Is hibiscus poisonous?

A:

Quick Answer

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals indicates that hibiscus is poisonous to dogs, cats and horses. Other types of hibiscus include the rose of Sharon and the rose of China. The flower has large trumpet-like flowers in shades of yellow, white, pink, red, orange or purple.

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Is hibiscus poisonous?
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Full Answer

Hibiscus is toxic to pets and can induce vomiting, nausea, anorexia and diarrhea. If there is a suspicion of hibiscus poisoning, take the animal to a veterinarian for observation. Hibiscus can be grown outdoors in warmer climates or be a houseplant during the cooler seasons. Keep the hibiscus out of reach of pets.


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