Q:

Are honeysuckle berries poisonous?

A:

Quick Answer

According to Eat the Weeds, there are 180 varieties of honeysuckles. Some have edible berries, but most have toxic berries. Careful identification would be needed to eat berries from honeysuckle plants. However, they do have nectar inside their flowers that is safe for people to consume.

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Full Answer

Honeysuckles have simple green leaves and scented bell-like flowers. Honeysuckles can grow up to 80 feet long and develop black fleshy fruits and white or yellow flowers. Honeysuckles are usually found on roadsides or in open woods, thickets or landscaping. Flowering occurs May to July in the cold environments and year-round in the warmer climates.

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