Q:

What is HRC steel?

A:

HRC is an abbreviation for hot rolled coil steel or an abbreviation for Rockwell Hardness of steel measured on the C scale. The abbreviation is used for both a type of steel and a futures contract for that steel traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange, Globex and Clearport.

Hot rolled coiled steel is used in the construction and automotive industries for the manufacture of pipes, vehicle parts and other engineering applications. Sheet metal, guard rails and railroad tracks are also commonly made from it. HRC steel futures trade under the symbol "HR" on all applicable markets and are recorded in United States dollars.

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