Q:

What is wrong when my water faucet is sputtering?

A:

According to the San Francisco Gate, the leading cause of sputtering water faucets is trapped air in the plumbing lines. The quickest way to stop the sputtering is to expel the air by turning on all available faucets simultaneously. This increases the velocity of the water passing through high points in the piping, where air pockets form, blasting the air out and restoring proper water flow.

The most effective way to expunge air in plumbing lines is to turn on the hot and cold taps of every sink, shower and bathtub, beginning in rooms closest to the household's water shutoff valve. Flush all of the toilets as well. If the house has laundry machines or an electric dishwasher, run them.

The San Francisco Gate explains that eradicating huge air pockets takes up to 15 minutes. Leave the water on and walk through the house, noting which faucets are sputtering and which have normal water flow. When the sputtering disappears entirely, turn off the faucet the farthest distance from the main water supply valve. If there is a toilet in the room, flush it after closing the faucet. Repeat this process throughout the house, flushing the toilets only after closing the faucet.

This technique eradicates most sputtering problems without expensive professional intervention. If the sputtering continues, however, seek assistance from a certified plumber.


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