Q:

Can a triangle have two perpendicular sides?

A:

A triangle can have two perpendicular sides. If two sides are perpendicular, the angle they form is a right angle. A triangle can have only one right angle.

A triangle cannot have two sides perpendicular to a third side. The sum of the three angles of a triangle is exactly 180 degrees. It must have three sides and three angles. Thus, it cannot have two angles whose sum comes to 180 degrees.

In a right triangle, two sides are always perpendicular. The measurements of these sides are used to calculate the area of a right triangle. In an acute or an obtuse triangle, no two sides are perpendicular.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is arctan(x) in math?

    A:

    The function arctan(x) describes the inverse tangent of x, wherein the ratio between the length of the sides opposite and adjacent to the angle can be used to determine the degrees or radian of the angle. Arctan can also be written as tan to the power of minus one.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the "law of tangents"?

    A:

    The law of tangents states that for a triangle with sides a, b and c and corresponding angles A, B and C, (a - b)/(a + b) is equal to the tangent of (1/2[A - B])/(1/2[A + B]).

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the definition of "plane trigonometry"?

    A:

    "Plane trigonometry" is a branch of mathematics that focuses on the relationship between the sides and angles of a triangle. Plane trigonometry builds upon the basic concepts of Euclidean geometry, and it has applications in a variety of mathematical fields, from physics to advanced calculus.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the midline theorem?

    A:

    The midline theorem, formally known as Varignon's theorem, states that a parallelogram is formed when the midpoints of the sides of any convex quadrilateral are connected in order. The area of the Varignon parallelogram is half of the original quadrilateral.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore