Q:

What are some examples using sinusoidal functions in real life?

A:

In the real world, sinusoidal functions can be used to describe mechanical functions such as the swinging of a pendulum or natural phenomena such as hours of daylight. Sinusoidal functions graph wave forms.

As such, sinusoidal functions can be used to describe any phenomenon that displays a wave or wave-like pattern or by extension any predictable periodic behavior. They are applicable in many real life cases.

  • The periodic rotations of a crankshaft in an engine
  • The rotation of a Ferris wheel
  • The fluctuating hours of daylight in a specific location throughout a calendar year
  • Fluctuating use of energy to heat a home through the seasons.

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