Q:

What is a manipulated variable?

A:

The manipulated variable in an experiment is the independent variable; it is not affected by the experiment's other variables. HowStuffWorks explains that it is the variable the experimenter controls. When there are control and experimental groups, the manipulated variable is the treatment supplied to the experimental group and denied the control group.

When a scientist graphs the results of an experiment, he graphs the manipulated variable on the x-axis of the graph. One common manipulated variable is time. The scientist controls the time at which he makes the measurements. The y-axis represents the response or dependant variable. Temperature is a common response variable.

Because it is easy to confuse variables in the experiment, About.com offers the mnemonic DRY MIX to help students. It translates: dependant, response, y-axis; manipulated, independent, x-axis. Another way to help keep these values from being confused is through remembering that the independent variable is the "I do" variable.

In addition to manipulated variables and response variables, experiments often include controlled and extraneous variables. Controlled variables are those which the experimenter attempts to keep the same for both groups. Extraneous variables often change the outcome of the experiment in an accidental or unanticipated way. While the experimenter does not graph these variables, it is important for him to keep a record of them in his notes.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What is a math extrapolate formula?

    A:

    A math extrapolate formula is an equation used to predict the value of the dependent variable from an independent variable not found within the range of data. An example of such a formula is y=2x+5, when the range of values for x is normally between 0 and 10. If the value of x is 20, it can still be plugged into the equation to find that y=2(20)+5=45.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a constant variable in science?

    A:

    A constant variable, normally called a controlled variable, is the term for a variable that remains constant throughout an experiment, though other variables may change. An example is the water pressure for a faucet when measuring the amount of water released when the faucet is opened to various increments.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many variables should an experiment have?

    A:

    Ideally, an experiment should have an independent variable, a dependant variable, and a control variable. Researchers take steps to eliminate as many extraneous variable as possible, although eliminating all of them might be impossible in certain scenarios.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is single variable calculus?

    A:

    Single variable calculus covers derivative and integral functions that contain one variable. Functions that contain two or more variables are a part of multivariable calculus.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore