Q:

What is math so important?

A:

Quick Answer

Math is important because it is used in everyday life. People use math when buying things, making life plans and making other calculations.

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What is math so important?
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Math is vital in so many different areas, and some level of the subject is required for the majority of jobs in the United States. Basic math is also needed for advanced areas of mathematics including algebra and geometry. According to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, students that take higher levels of math in high school are more likely to pursue a college education than students who just stick to the basic level. Certain levels of math are also required for admission to many different colleges.

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