Q:

What is the SSS congruence postulate?

A:

The SSS congruence postulate states that if all three sides of one triangle are congruent to the corresponding sides of another triangle, the triangles themselves are congruent. Triangles are congruent if, when one is superimposed on another, they match.

Several ways exist to prove triangles congruent. Aside from the SSS (or side-side-side) method, there are the SAS (side-angle-side), ASA (angle-side-angle), AAS (angle-angle-side) and HL (hypotenuse-leg) postulates. If triangles are congruent by any one of these, they are congruent. Congruent triangles have the same shape and size, though it is possible for one to be a mirror image of the other or rotated in some other way.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What are types of triangles?

    A:

    Several types of triangles exist, including scalene, isosceles, equilateral, right, obtuse and acute. Triangles are categorized according to their sides, angles or a combination of both.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why are triangles so strong?

    A:

    Triangles are strong because of their inherent structural characteristics. The corner angles of a triangle cannot change without an accompanying change in the length of the edge. Therefore, in order to change a triangle’s shape, an edge must collapse.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you classify triangles?

    A:

    While there are several main types of classifications, triangles are typically classified by the measure of their interior angles or the number of equal sides. Each of these classifications has three types of triangles.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many triangles are there in a hexagon?

    A:

    Using each edge of the hexagon as one of the bases of a triangle, only six triangles can be inscribed within a regular hexagon. A new vertex should be added at the midpoint of the hexagon to create the remaining triangles, which will share this new vertex.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore