Q:

What are the adaptations of shrimp?

A:

Shrimp have several unique adaptive traits, including highly efficient osmoregulation systems and the ability to change gender, both help them survive in their environments. The adaptations of shrimp help them withstand short- and long-term environmental hazards and make them suited to live in extreme habitats.

Shrimp have highly efficient osmoregulation systems, which allow them to endure salt levels in high concentrations — up to 10 times greater than that of seawater. Shrimp also grow special cysts, called gastrula embryos, which they crawl inside to wait out droughts and live through critical environmental conditions. These shells contain food and water and can help shrimp live for long periods of time.

Sources:

  1. nih.gov

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