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What is a baby camel called?

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Quick Answer

A baby camel is known as a calf. Female camels generally only give birth to one calf after a 13-month pregnancy.

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What is a baby camel called?
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Full Answer

Camel calves are born with their eyes open, and they can run only a few hours after being born. Unless forced apart, the camel and her calf will live together for the first few years of the camel's life. Most camel owners begin teaching young camels to kneel and to carry packs when the calves are just over a year old. Camels are well known for their ability to survive for weeks without water or food, an adaptation that makes them perfectly suited for life in the desert.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a female camel called?

    A:

    Female camels are called cows. Just like some other ungulates and animals, male camels are also called bulls and their young are known as calves.

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  • Q:

    What is the habitat of a camel?

    A:

    Camels, who are capable of storing water within their bodies, are most often found in desert environments. However, the specifics of their habitats depend upon the breed.

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  • Q:

    How long can a camel last without water?

    A:

    According to the California Academy of Sciences, camels can survive for up to six months without drinking water. Camels consume large quantities of water at one time and can drink up to 35 gallons of water in six minutes, allowing for optimal fluid conservation.

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  • Q:

    What are some interesting camel facts for kids?

    A:

    A common belief is that camels store water in their humps, but the humps are actually reservoirs that store fat. This allows the camel to remain cool in hot temperatures, as the rest of its body is thinly insulated. Arabian camels have a single hump, while Asian camels have two humps.

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