Q:

What do banana spiders eat?

A:

Quick Answer

The banana spider preys upon a wide variety of smaller insects that include flies, stink bugs, wasps, mosquitoes, bees, butterflies and moths. Some banana spiders have also been observed eating dragonflies and beetles. They are opportunistic hunters and may change their diet with the change of seasons,

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Full Answer

Like the black widow, after mating, the female banana spider consumes the male.

The webs spun by the banana spider have a zig-zag pattern and are golden yellow in color. This serves a dual purpose: it aids in attracting and trapping bees that are drawn to its bright yellow color, and it serves as camouflage, blending the web more easily with the surrounding foliage.

After snaring its prey, the banana spider wraps it in a cocoon and carries to the web's interior for safekeeping.

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