Q:

Do bears have tails?

A:

Unlike many animals, bears do not have tails. In the place of a tail, a bear has a flap of skin on its backside.

Millions of years ago, bears did have tails, and many scientists believe that the tails began reducing in size throughout time since they were not at all useful to the animal. The flap of skin that is in place of the tail on a bear can measure over 4 inches in length, but it serves no purpose. While some animals use their tails as a defensive mechanism or as a way to communicate, a bear does neither of these. Many bears are poached around the world for other body parts, including their gallbladders, which are highly valued in some cultures.

Sources:

  1. americanbear.org

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