Q:

How are bloodworms grown?

A:

Quick Answer

Bloodworms are reproduced or grown in a pool of water that must be filled with sediment to allow them to breed, grow and thrive. Sediment of any sort can be used, and good choices include flour, algae and even rabbit food pellets.

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Full Answer

The sediment that is placed in the water is used by the bloodworms to create tubes. Bloodworms use these tubes to help protect them from outside threats.

Once an initial set of bloodworms has been added to the water source, a person can expect to have 100 bloodworms per square foot after about one week.

Bloodworms are used to feed fish and other sea creatures.

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