Q:

Do Burmese pythons have teeth?

A:

Quick Answer

Burmese pythons do not have fangs, but are constrictors that have large teeth that curve rearward. The curved teeth inside of a Burmese python's mouth are excellent for grabbing prey, such as birds, pigs and other reptiles. Once a python has an unsuspecting prey in its mouth, there is little chance that it will be able to escape.

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Full Answer

The Burmese python is one of the largest snakes in the world and is the most massive sub species of Indian pythons. It can be found living in grassland, marsh, swamp and rocky foothill habitats, but mainly lives in rain forests. Burmese pythons live in these habitats in countries, such as China, Thailand, Burma and the Malay Archipelago.

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