Q:

Can a kiwi bird fly?

A:

Quick Answer

The kiwi bird is a flightless bird that is native to New Zealand. Like many other ratites, the kiwi has adapted to life with no keel on its sternum to anchor wing muscles, and its vestigial wings are so small they are often invisible under its feathers.

Know More
Can a kiwi bird fly?
Credit: Joshua Eckert Flickr CC-BY-2.0

Full Answer

The kiwi has a long beak that is about a third of the size of its entire body. The female is approximately 16 inches tall and weighs around 6 pounds, while the male weighs around 5 pounds. The bird has thick brown hair-like feathers and has other features that are quite unlike any other bird on the planet.

Sources:

  1. ca.us
  2. wikipedia.org

Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Do roadrunners fly?

    A:

    Roadrunners can fly, but they prefer to run as their long legs and lean frames are built for this activity. Roadrunners, or Geococcyx, can reach speeds of up to 20 miles per hour when they run.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the heaviest flying bird?

    A:

    The heaviest flying birds are the kori bustard and the great bustard, which can both weigh up to 42 pounds each. The males of each species are the largest, with females weighing far less.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the highest flying bird?

    A:

    The highest flying bird is the bar-headed goose, which can reach heights of around 21,120 feet. However, these geese typically travel at lower heights for most of their flight.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What do kiwi birds eat?

    A:

    Kiwis are omnivorous birds, which means that they feed on both plants and animals. Since kiwis live in diverse habitats, their diets are extremely varied. Some feed primarily on nuts, seeds and leaves, while others eat mostly invertebrate animals such as worms. They have also been known to eat frogs, small fish, eels and even crayfish out of ponds.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore