Can Lovebirds talk?
Credit:Frank VassenFlickrCC-BY-2.0
Q:

Can Lovebirds talk?

A:

Quick Answer

Lovebirds do not have the ability to talk, but they do let off a loud screech when they are looking for food or attention. Although they can't talk, lovebirds can learn to mimic sounds.

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Full Answer

Lovebirds are known to chatter throughout the day. They are very loud and vocal when compared to other birds. Their loud noises are often considered a nuisance. This is important to consider when making the decision to purchase one of these birds.

Playing a lovebird sounds from other lovebirds via a soundboard or recording will teach them and assist them in learn new sounds, tunes and songs.

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